Posts Tagged ‘critic’

What with all the snow & cold & sniffles & whatnot, I discovered myself last week without a thing to wear. Yes, really. I couldn’t remember the last time I’d been to the laundromat and foraging about the back of the floor of my closet yielded nothing but a few fossilized hairballs. So, heaving a sigh, I filled one basket with Warm and a second with Cold, and set off into the wilds of Sunderland, where my favorite (because usually empty) laundromat awaits.

Because I hate doing laundry so much, I always take something along that might at least give me a tad of simple pleasure, for balance —  usually an art book or journal or just some purty pictures. This time I brought a very plump overview of what the blurbs  contend are the most majorly exciting artists on the scene today (or at least yesterday, since the book was published  in 2008).

I did like a lot of the pictures – 2008, if you’ll remember, was a year filled with taxidermy, toys, and, as usual, huge inhuman installations — but what I found most striking was the language with which these works were described. I’m wondering now if the jargon of 2008 still works today and, if so, should I be taking more advantage of it.

Here’s a list of words and phrases I found in the text which, I think, are intended to indicate that the work under discussion is Very Very Very Important and Earthshaking and Cool:
visual and visceral — appropriation — decontextualization — multiple encoding — iconic — temporal flow — not strictly ocular — juxtaposition — deliriously infantile — revealing cultural codes — strange, mysterious quotidian objects — transformational — process — post-non-representational —

And so on. I’m sure you know where I’m heading with this (don’t use a small word when a bigger or more obscure one is available), but you can’t really get the true flavor without the surrounding text, which both in style and substance declares itself an art know-it-all, with the perfect vocabulary to set itself apart from the yahoos of the world.

Possibly I can boost my own art career by making more and better use of these and other polysyllabic words & perplexing terms. People will read my artist statement and scratch their heads, but by gosh they’ll pay attention and maybe even think I’m some kind of genius.  Then again, possibly I need to get a brand new book describing in brand new, yet still obfuscatory,  jargon just who’s the hottest of the hot cutting-edge artists of 2014.

 

 

 

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